Asteris

Why Pods? 5 Solid Use Cases

// Brian Hicks // Kubernetes

You’ve immersed yourself in the containerization world for a while. Kubernetes is the next frontier, but the concept of a pod is a little foreign. When you first learn about pods it’s hard to think of a use case where a pod is a more natural fit than a container. Plus, the tutorials and documentation cover what a pod is rather than why you should use one. It’s easy to think up “trivial” use cases, but how are people actually using pods in the real world?

Well, wonder no longer. We’re cover five real world use cases for pods. These should provide some insight into when and why we should use pods.

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Service Discovery Outside Kubernetes

// Brian Hicks // Kubernetes

You’ve started your Kubernetes cluster, and you’re all ready to move apps inside. Only one question remains: what happens when services are not hosted in Kubernetes? How can you reference these services?

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The Hamburger of Kubernetes: Service Types

// Brian Hicks // Kubernetes

Backend and frontend services should interoperate easily. To do that, Kubernetes has three service types: ClusterIP, NodePort, and LoadBalancer. But which should you use? ClusterIP and LoadBalancer seem self-explanatory, but what would you use NodePort for? Even though there are only three options, it can get a little confusing!

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Setting up rkt

// Brian Hicks // rkt

So you want to try rkt, but a package isn’t available for your distribution. Ideally, you could just run yum install rkt, but the packages are a ways off from being ready for CentOS and Fedora. Frustrating. So what do we do? Install ourselves!

The installation process is actually pretty simple. Rkt is written in Go, and has no other dependencies than a relatively recent kernel. In fact, on CentOS, the setup can be reduced to a handful of steps:

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Mesos Log Format: What Does it All Mean?

// Brian Hicks // Mesos

When you’re using Mesos, sooner or later you’re going to need to look in the logs to figure something out. Inevitably, you’ll be greeted by a line like this:

I0909 22:47:01.240617 21904 master.cpp:3600] Sending 1 offers to framework {id}

Uh… what? How do I read that? What are all those arguments? What even is I0909?

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